Thursday, February 21, 2008

Word on the arXiv

The arXiv have announced that they now support submissions of "Microsoft Word DOCX or other OOXML (Office Open XML) document[s]". While I am perfectly aware that high-energy physicists (or indeed any kind of physicists) are not the only users of the arXiv, and that usage of TeX is not terribly common outside the physics/mathematics field (though I know a few philosophers and economists, and even one historian, who were won over by the superior look of texts typeset in LaTeX), I find this a little worrying, especially given that the arXiv acknowledges support from the Microsoft Technical Computing Initiative. What worries me is the possibility that this might be the first step towards a less open information architecture at the arXiv, and by implication in the high-energy physics communications sector. Will Microsoft try to gain a foothold, leading to the eventual establishment of their "open" (not) formats as the only accepted submission and download format? One sincerely hopes not.

5 comments:

wolfgang said...

what next? Lattice QCD simulations as Excel macros?

Kea said...

LOL!! The arxiv isn't open! It's a big JOKE.

Georg said...

Dear Kea,
I'm not quite sure what you are saying -- the arXiv is certainly open and free to all readers, and so far has been based entirely on genuinely open multi-platform exchange formats which can be read and created using free software. No joke there, as far as I can see.

Georg said...

Dear Wolfgang,
that would not be quite the same thing: Excel (or any other spreadsheet application) is evidently totally unsuitable for parallel high-performance applications such as QCD simulations. Word on the other hand can be used to create scientific papers (even if they look ugly) -- it is the inherently proprietary nature of Microsoft's "open" document format that I object to. In case you didn't follow the link in the article, OOXML allows for proprietary binary fields and "application-defined" behavior, meaning that it is likely impossible to create a fully functional implementation without infringing some Microsoft patent. That, and that alone, is the reason I find the adoption of the OOXML format by an open repository problematic.

pablo said...

Including support for OOXML and not for ODT (which is a truly open standard and has several free implementations) is not nice from arxiv. I was going to upload my first paper when I read about that. Know any other preprint server?